Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Let's Prevent Heatstroke Together

Three children have died from heatstroke in hot cars this year. Let’s work together to prevent another tragedy. Create reminders and be on the lookout for young kids in hot cars. Learn more http://bit.ly/1gy2XPR



Thursday, March 26, 2015

Toss Your Meds Into a Drop-Box

Wondering what to do with unused or expired medications? There are 5 places in Guilford County where you can drop off medications--no questions asked. Permanent drop-boxes are located in Greensboro, High Point, Summerfield and Whitsett. The drop-boxes look like a postal mail box and law enforcement officers empty them regularly. The medications are then incinerated. This program keeps the meds from being accidentally misused or intentionally abused and prevents contamination of our water supply. So, clean out those closets and dispose of your medications safely!

Drop Box Locations
  • Greensboro Police Department
    300 Swing Rd.
    Greensboro, NC
    Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Greensboro Police Department
    1106 Maple St. 
    Greensboro, NC
    Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Guilford County Sheriff's Office 
    District 1 Office 
    7506 Summerfield Rd.
    Summerfield, NC
    Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Guilford County Sheriff's Office 
    District 2 Office in Stoney Creek
    6307-B Burlington Rd.
    Whitsett, NC
    Mon. - Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • High Point Police Department
    1009 Leonard Ave.
    High Point, NC
    Open 24/7

Medication Safety Tips for Parents

The Hard Facts

Medications are the leading cause of child poisoning. In 2011, 67,700 children were seen in emergency room for medicine poisoning. That’s one child every eight hours.  Almost all of these visits are because the child got into medicines during a moment alone.

Top Tips

  • Put all medicines up and away and out of sight including your own.Make sure that all medicines and vitamins are stored out of reach and out of sight of children. In 3 out of 4 emergency room visits for medicine poisoning, the child got into medicine belonging to a parent or grandparent.
  • Consider places where kids get into medicine. Kids get into medication in all sorts of places, like in purses and nightstands.  In 67% of emergency room visits for medicine poisoning, the medicine was left within reach of a child, such as in a purse, on a counter or dresser or on the ground.
  • Consider products you might not think about as medicines. Most parents store medicine up and away - or at least the products they consider to be medicine. They may not think about products such as diaper rash remedies, vitamins or eye drops as medicine, but they actually are and need to be stored safely.  
  • Use the dosing device that comes with the medicine. Proper dosing is important, particularly for young children. Kitchen spoons aren't all the same, and a teaspoon or tablespoon used for cooking won't measure the same amount as the dosing device. Use the dosing device that comes with the medicine to prevent dosing errors.
  • Put the toll-free Poison Help Number into your home and cell phone: 1-800-222-1222. You can also put the number on your refrigerator or another place in your home where the babysitters and caregivers can see it. And remember, the poison help number is not just for emergencies, you can call with questions about how to take or give medicine.

Monday, March 23, 2015

Common Car Seat Mistakes

Car seats can be confusing, but you have several resources to help you get the perfect fit. Use your instruction manual, your vehicle owner's manual and car seat labels to help you. You can also go to the car seat manufacturer's website for videos and tips or call their 800 number to speak to a customer service representative.

The most common mistakes are a loose harness on the child, a loose installation in the vehicle, and moving the child to the next stage too soon. Just remember pinch, inch, pounds (and inches). If you can pinch the harness, it's too loose. If you can move the seat more than an inch in the vehicle, it's too loose. Keep your child in each stage until he or she reaches the upper weight limit (pounds) or height limit (inches).



To find out if you are using your car seat correctly, make an appointment with a local technician. Visit www.buckleupnc.org/local-programs-checking-stations to find a list of child passenger safety technicians near you. Safe Kids Worldwide has a variety of tips, videos and infographics to answer your car seat questions.


Parents Taking Traveling Risks--Are You One of Them?

Most parents want what's best for their kids, however, research shows they may take shortcuts when it comes to traveling. A survey from Safe Kids Worldwide shows that a significant number of parents do not buckle up their child for these reasons: when they are not going far, when they are in a rush, or when traveling overnight.

It is simply a life or death situation when choosing to travel with your child unrestrained. Car crashes are the leading cause of death for children. This isn't a controversial decision. Buckle up every ride, every time. Your child's life depends on it.

To find out if you are using your car seat correctly, make an appointment with a local technician. Visit www.buckleupnc.org/local-programs-checking-stations to find a list of child passenger safety technicians near you. Safe Kids Worldwide has a variety of tips, videos and infographics to answer your car seat questions.